Fighting on After DACA Decision

Posted September 7, 2017 /

CASA Demands Congress Take Up Issue Now 

Now that the Trump Administration has struck another devastating blow to the immigrant community by announcing the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), CASA is turning to Congress to do the right thing and pass a clean Dream Act so that the more than 800,000 young Americans that qualify, can continue working, studying and contributing to the strength of this country.
 
In his announcement, Sessions said the administration will immediately stop accepting new applications for DACA protections. That means that if Congress doesn’t act, current DACA recipients will see their protections end when their current 2-year authorization expires.

CASA’s vision going forward is clear.  

  • We will continue to fight for DACAmented youth as well as all immigrants where all people can live as their full and authentic selves in safety and with opportunity.
  • We will hold legal clinics for DACAmented youth who need to renew their DACA documentation before March 5, 2018, the deadline given by the Department of Justice. The clinics will be held September 16th, 23rd, and 30th
  • We will fight so that Congress pass legislation that protects DREAMers.

These are our demands for members of Congress:

  • Publicly denounce Trump’s actions and statements regarding immigration
  • Vote to support the Dream Act of 2017.  This is critical legislation that protects immigrant youth and doesn’t hurt parent, families and friends.
  • Oppose legislation that would increase enforcement and funding for a border wall. DACAmented youth refuse be used as bargaining chips to pass white supremacist hate. We must do away with the notion that protecting some immigrants requires inflicting more pain on other immigrants. That notion is morally wrong and we will oppose it.
  • Support legislation to defend TPS.  More than 300,000 people are at risk of losing their Temporary Protected Status over the next six months.  Some people have held this status for almost twenty years, many are home and small business owners, and all of them have successfully passed multiple background checks.  Bipartisan legislation will be introduced to provide a permanent status to these families currently held in limbo.